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Treatments


Life in a city has many advantages to it, one being that the medical care is of the more advanced kind. Though herbal treatments are used, the majority of treatments are with formulas the Caste of Physicians has developed over centuries of research. The widespread use of stabilization serum and many generations of serum-treated Goreans have produced people that heal injury more quickly and seldom suffer from illness. See the Recovery Times to advise as to how long it will take to heal.

Wound Treatment

Bleeding: If there is an artery or vein bleeding (spurting blood out), then that must be carefully stitched back together first with a fine curved needle and fine gut suture. There are clamps to close the cut artery or vein until it can be repaired. If there is excessive bleeding, such as in a limb or side, a cauterizing iron may be used to sear it shut. This is usually done when there is no better medical treatment available.

Stitching: Use small, fine, even stitches, trying not to pucker the skin. Tie off each single stitch to prevent one from being ripped and loosening others.

No Stitches Required: Clean the area using either warm water with green herbal powder or antiseptic soap, or paga. Sprinkle with green powder, if desired, then layer on healing salve. Bandage, if more than a surface scratch.

Bandaging: Wounds that require stitching need to be bandaged. A pad is made to cover the wound, then wrapped with bandage. Tear or cut the end to tie in place. Change bandages daily until no longer needed.

Other Treatments

Arrows: An arrow should be removed carefully. If it is not lodged in a vital area. Push it through and out the other side. If in a vital area, it will be necessary to cut it out. Barbed arrows should be pushed through to minimize the damage, unless it is in a vital area. Remove the shaft before working on a barbed arrowhead. Clean, stitch, and bandage as needed. (Simple-pile arrows are relatively easy to remove, as they do not have barbs, like a broad-headed war arrow.)

Beasts: Be sure there are no teeth or claws left in the wound. Clean thoroughly, as some animals may have residues that are poisonous. Stitch, if needed, apply healing salve and bandage.

Burns: Apply a cold water compress to soothe. Lance any blisters that have formed. Cleanse using warm water with green herbal powder or antiseptic soap. Treat with healing salve. Apply a dressing only if the burn is deep or there is other damage that breaks the skin.

Broken Bones: Set by sharply pulling the ends into place. Run a finger along the bone to be sure it is straight and snugly bandage splints to keep it immobile.

Bruising or Muscle Strain: Apply cold compresses or a cool poultice. Apply numbing salve for pain or give medicine to soothe away discomfort. For swelling, herbal poultices or cold water soaks may be used. For stiffness, hot water soaks and massage may be used. There are also medicines to decrease swelling.

Choking: Get behind the patient and reach around with both hands at abdomen. Quickly jerk back and up in the diaphragm. This will force lots of air out and make the patient cough out the lodged object. If not, see Tracheotomy.

Congestion: An ointment, poultice or salve of made with an aromatic may be applied to the chest to relieve breathing. A medicine to dcongest can be given.

Cramp: There are medicines to relieve the condition, including female cramping. A physician should be consulted, since the cramping can a symptom of some other condition.

Headache: Compresses can help. There are medicines for this. Consult a physician.

Insect Bites: If the bite has a known poison to it, use antivenin injection. For the affected area, clean and apply healing salve. If the bite is of a non-poisonous insect but there are many bites, consider treating as though the person has received a poisonous bite.

Lung, Collapsed: Use the chest tube in the med kit. Insert between the ribs on the side of the injured lung. Use a sharp trocar to make the hole (ask permission first. A trocar is an ice pick and can be considered a weapon). Insert chest tube between ribs. Stab gently with firm pressure with a little twist. Remove trocar and leave the tube. Blow hard on the end of the tube, until you hear the lung pop back open. Pad the end to catch bloody drainage and stitch in place. Remove the chest tube when lungs sound clear and stitch back together, usually two days.

Lung, Punctured: Use the chest tube in med kit and insert between the ribs on side of injured lung. Use a sharp trocar to make the hole (ask permission first It is an ice pick and can be considered a weapon). Insert the chest tube between ribs. Stab gently with firm pressure with a little twist. Remove trocar and leave the tube. Pad the end to catch bloody drainage and stitch in place. Remove the chest tube when lungs sound clear and stitch back together, usually two days.

Nausea: There are medicines for this. Consult a physician, since this could be a symptom of another condition.

Poison: There are antivenins or antitoxins available for certain poisons. Except for the deadly ones like ost, there is antivenin, if given within a certain amount of time (to be determined in play).

Sedative: This is used when quick or strong sedation is needed for rest or for surgery. The most effective are capture scent and frobicain. Capture scent is given by cloth upon the nose. It must be carefully timed by counting. If the person begins to show reaction to it, cease using it until the symptoms have eased. Frobicain is given by injection.

Shock: This can occur with almost any injury, so remain alert for it. Signs of shock include pale, clammy skin, rapid heart rate, low blood pressure, decreased alertness, and confusion. To treat, have the person lie down and elevate feet, unless it is a head wound. Loosen any tight or restrictive clothing. Keep the person as calm as possible. Keep warm, though not to the point of overheating. At this time, liquids may be given.

Sleep: There are sedatives that encourage resting and sleep.

Tracheotomy: If airway is blocked due to smoke inhalation or blocking objects or broken windpipe, and the patient cannot breathe, take a knife and cut a small hole at base of neck where the indentation is. That is just below Adamís apple for a man. Insert some tubing, The patient will be able to breathe now. Remove object or repair the broken windpipe and sew back the trachea. For smoke inhalation, have the patient drink cool tea of peppermint and sage for two days. When the patient can breath better, sew back the trachea.




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